Immunology/Immunotherapy Program Members

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Immunology/Immunotherapy Program Members

Program Leaders

Victor H. Engelhard, PhD, Program Co-Leader
Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
T lymphocyte based immunity to antigens expressed on melanoma and other tumors.

Craig L. Slingluff, MD, Program Co-Leader
Professor of Surgery
Cancer vaccines and combination immunotherapy for melanoma, with evaluation of the cellular immune response and the tumor microenvironment.

 

Full Program Members

Reid Adams, MD
Professor, Department of Surgery
Clinical trials of pancreatic cancer vaccine; multidisciplinary management of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

Timothy P. Bender, PhD
Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology
Lymphocyte development and the regulation of gene expression by c-myb during hematopoiesis
and lymphomagenesis.

Thomas J. Braciale, MD, PhD
Professor, Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Regulation of CD8 T lymphocyte activation and effector function by cytokines; Control of T cell
activation within the lung microenvironment.

Michael G. Brown, PhD
Associate Professor, Departments of Internal Medicine (Rheumatology) and Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
NK cells and their receptors in immunity to cytomegalovirus.

Kimberly A. Bullock, PhD
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Identification of immunogenic peptides for breast cancer vaccines; functionality and trafficking
capabilities of vaccine-expanded T cells; immunotherapy trial design.

Timothy N. J. Bullock, PhD
Associate Professor, Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Increasing the presence and function of T cells in the tumor microenvironment; impact of CD70-CD27 co-stimulation on T cell function; function of CD4 T cells in enhancing CD8 T cell recruitment to tumors.

John Densmore, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

Clinical investigations of new targeted therapies in multiple myeloma.

Loren D. Erickson, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Processes that control commitment of antigen-stimulated B cells to become long-lived plasma cells and that control development and progression of malignant plasma cells.

Adam N. Goldfarb, MD
Professor, Department of Pathology
Erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation to identify new approaches toward treatment of anemias and thrombocytopenias in cancer patients and to shed light on the pathogenesis of megakaryocytic leukemias.

William W. Grosh, MD
Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)
Clinical trials of immunologic and targeted therapies for melanoma.

Young S. Hahn, PhD
Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Immunoregulatory mechanisms employed by Hepatitis C virus to evade host immunity and
establish persistent infection leading to hepatocellular carcinoma.

Dean H. Kedes, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Departments of Internal Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Microbiology
Kaposi’s sarcoma virus – tumorigenesis, immune responses and viral immune evasion mechanisms.

Tamila Kindwall-Keller, DO
Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)
Multiple myelomoa, Umbilical cord blood transplant.

Tracey Krupski, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Department of Urology
Role of interferon-inducible CXC chemokines and CXCR3 in therapeutic effect of intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer; clinical investigation of adenosine inhibition to modulate the tumor response to BCG.

Ulrike M. Lorenz, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
SHP-1 signaling pathways that influence T cell development and activation with a special focus on regulatory T cells and TH17 cells and how they affect tumor immunity.

Osama Rahma, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Immunotherapy in Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancer.

Kodi S. Ravichandran, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Intracellular signaling pathways in hematopoietic cells and their regulation of growth and differentiation; control of apoptosis and the role of cell clearance pathways in cancer, differentiation and inflammation.

Ronald P. Taylor, PhD
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Mechanisms of action of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies.

Kenneth S.K. Tung, MD
Professor, Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
Mechanisms of tolerance and autoimmune response to testis specific antigens as a model to understand immunity to human cancer-testes antigens.

Geoffrey R. Weiss, MD
Professor and Division Chief, Department of Internal Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)
Clinical investigations of immunotherapy and new targeted therapies for malignant melanoma and GU malignancies.

Michael E. Williams, MD
Byrd S. Leavell Professor of Medicine and Professor of Pathology  - Chief, Hematology/Oncology Division  - Director, Hematologic Malignancies Section

Cancer immunotherapy, immunochemotherapy and targeted therapeutics with a focus in mantle cell lymphoma, CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including translational and early phase clinical research for MCL and CLL.

 

Associate Program Members

Michael G. Douvas, MD
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Hematology and Oncology
Core binding factor, targeted therapy for leukemia, young adult oncology

John C. Herr, PhD
Director, Center for Research in Contraceptive and Reproductive Health; Professor, Department of Cell Biology

Thomas A. Platts-Mills, MD, PhD
Professor of Internal Medicine (Allergy and Clinical Immunology)
Preexisting IgE responses to the carbohydrates on humanized monoclonal antibodies used for cancer immunotherapy that can cause severe allergic responses in cancer patients, develop screening assays to avoid these reactions.

Angela L. Zarling, PhD
Research Assistant Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
T cell receptors that are specific for phosphopeptides, with the ultimate goal of using them to transduce T cells for adoptive cellular therapy.