Minutes 05.16.02

Minutes 05.16.02

University of Virginia School of Medicine

Curriculum Committee

Minutes 05.16.02

Pediatric Pathology Conference Room, 4:00 PM

Present (underlined) were: Reid Adams, Robert Bloodgood, Victoria Camerini, Anita Clayton, Al Connors, Lisa Coray, Gene Corbett, Donald Innes (Chair), Howard Kutchai, Nelle Linz, Nikhil Rao, Jerry Short, Bill Wilson, Debra Reed (secretary)

  1. Clinical Connections. The Clinical Connections Planning Group met today to review the previous sessions and plan the 2002-2003 programs. A tentative program follows:

    August 9

    Information Technology in Medicine

    September 20

    Sexual Health

    November 1

    Cognitive Impairment

    February 14

    Integrative Medicine

    April 7

    The Law and Medicine

    May 16

    Pain & Palliation

    June 27

    Open - possible Public Health Care


  2. The discussion, continued fom the previous week, focused on a program to improve the teaching of clinical skills with an emphasis on the physical exam. This program might take place at either the bedside or in the clinic and would likely differ for each clerkship.

    The goal is to improve the clinical competence of our medical students.This would be achieved through increased contact of students with dedicated "master" teachers. These "master teachers" in each clerkship would practice clinically and have a major portion of their time (and remuneration) dedicated to the clinical education of our students. Success at "master teaching" activities should also form the basis for promotion.

    The amount of each Master Teachers time devoted to teaching was discussed. Too little time might give the impression that this endeavor is not worthwhile - too much and it becomes more difficult to fund - figures from 25-50% were discussed.

    The Curriculum Committee considered the difficulty of creating and maintaining consistency between sites. It will be important that the clerkship director define the job description of the "master teacher" carefully delineating expectations and the amount of time to be devoted to hands-on teaching.

    Don Innes met with Mike Rein Director of the Internal Medicine Clerkship. Dr. Rein confirmed the need for improved third year instruction in physical diagnosis and enthusiastically supported the concept of a teaching attending. In Internal Medicine, approximately 18 students participate in each rotation while at the University of Virginia Hospital with another 6 at away sites. This proposal would probably be limited to in-house initially, however, the away sites already have faculty whose primary role is teaching.

    The Committee discussed a ward model "master teacher" program with a ratio of 1 teaching attending:2 students for 2 hours each week. In the two hour period the teaching attending would see a variety of patients with the students examining, presenting and discussing findings with the attending. Patients selected by the attending and/or the student's patients would be the subject of this bedside teaching. Emphasis would be on the proper acquisition and application of physical examination skills. Discussions would include the nature of the physical finding, the implied pathophysiology, the differential and the diagnostic significance.

    In the clinic model "master teacher" program one teaching attending would work with 2 students for 2 hours each week in the clinic. The student and teaching attending would see a variety of patients with the students examining, presenting and discussing findings with the attending. Patients selected by the attending would be the subject of this clinic teaching. Emphasis would be on the proper acquisition and application of physical examination skills. Discussions would include the nature of the physical finding, the implied pathophysiology, the differential and the diagnostic significance.

    Methods of evaluating the program would include the CPX exam, fourth year students exit interviews and possibly a one-year-out survey of students and their residency programs.

    The "master teacher" program is not meant to replace current lectures, ward and clinic duties. It is to be a supplement focused on physical diagnosis, history taking and development of diagnostic skills. This program should not replace or interfer with current student responsibilities on the wards and in the clinics.

    The Curriculum Committee discussed piloting this program in the Internal Medicine and possibly the Surgery Clerkships. The committee will solicit ideas from clerkship directors for "master teacher" program plans within their disciplines.

-Don Innes
-dmr