Minutes 05.13.04

Minutes 05.13.04

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
Minutes
05.13.04

Surgery Conference Room, 4:00 p.m.                         

Present (underlined) were: Reid Adams, Eve Bargmann, Robert Bloodgood,  Anita ClaytonGene Corbett, Carl Creutz,  Donald Innes (Chair)Vern Juel, Howard Kutchai, Chris Peterson, Jerry Short, Linda WatsonBill Wilson, Brian Wispelwey, Michael Richardson, Nnaemeka Anyadike, Debra Reed (secretary)

  1. Clerkship Evaluations

    LCME Accreditation Standards ED-30
    .The directors of all courses and clerkships must design and implement a system of formative and summative evaluation of student achievement in each course and clerkship.

    An important element of the system of evaluation should be to ensure the timeliness with which students are informed about their final performance in the course/clerkship. In general, final grades should be available within four to six weeks of the end of a course/clerkship. [annotation adopted and effective February 2004]

    The January 28, 2003 letter from the Curriculum Committee to all clerkship directors reads:

    “The timeliness of evaluative feedback needs to be improved. Evaluation forms from faculty should be available for students to review within 4 weeks of the end of a clerkship rotation. Students should have their fully completed clerkship evaluation within 5 weeks of the end of the clerkship.  Evaluation of students must be fair and accurately reflect the student’s performance.  Attendings and housestaff must provide narrative feedback along with the numerical selections; directors should include more details (from the narratives) in their comments reflecting the abilities, knowledge and skills of that student”. - January 28, 2003 letter from the Curriculum Committee to all clerkship directors

    Status of clerkship grades/evaluation summary sheets as of May 19, 2004 (7th week after the end of Period 3):

     

    Period 1

    Jun 30 - Sept 20, 03

    Period 2

    Sept 22 - Dec 20, 03

    Period 3

    Jan 5 - Mar 27, 04

    Period 4

    Apr 6 – Jun 26, 04

    FMED

    G & SE

    G & SE

    G & SE

     

    MED

    G & SE

    G

     

     

    OBGYN

    G & SE

    G & SE

    G

     

    PEDS

    G & SE

    G & SE

    G & SE

     

    PSYCH

    G & SE

    G & SE

     

     

    SURG

    G & SE

    G & SE

     

     

    Neurology has completed grades and summary evaluations through 4/24/04

    G = grades received    SE = summary evaluations


  2. USMLE-2CS

    USMLE™ Step 2 CS administration will begin on June 14, 2004 . The Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States, the National Board of Medical Examiners and the Educational Commission of Foreign Medical Graduates have announced that they “cannot guarantee that results of the clinical skills test will be available in time for decision making regarding applicants for residency positions in the 2005 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). As a result, program directors are encouraged not to require reporting of Step 2 CS results as a condition of application for a residency position or for ranking in this year's NRMP. They further restate that a specific reporting date cannot be guaranteed, regardless of the date on which Step 2 CS is taken and that they hope to begin reporting Step 2 CS performance late in the fall, but that delays could extend beyond deadlines for the 2005 NRMP Match. See http://www.usmle.org/

  3. Basic Science for Careers (BS4C)

    Vern Juel reviewed the BS4C plans.

    The basic program goals are:

    1. Relate basic science to the individual student’s career discipline focusing on application of basic science principles in the practice of the chosen discipline
    2. Highlight appropriate basic science from the 1st and 2nd year courses at this post-clerkship, pre-elective period in the curriculum
    3. Motivate and mentor students in their chosen field of medicine
    4. Increase the competitiveness of UVA medical students for the top residency programs /
    5.  Increase interest in careers in academic medicine

    The format is one of a four week, full-time experience, in May following the Core Clerkship period, prior to residency applications, auditions and USMLE-2. Three types of educational activities:

    1.  (1 or 2 per week) – on topics of general, but sophisticated, interest to all fields
    2.  Selective sessions (4 or 5 per week) – on topics that cross over multiple, but not all, medical disciplines.
    3. Career-oriented small groups of 10-15 students, e.g. the OBGYN career group, emphasize individual student research and presentation.

    The overall BS4C program is designed to step beyond the basic sciences as presented in the Foundations and Integrated Core Systems. It is anticipated that clinicians and basic scientists will share to varying degrees in the plenary and selective and career-oriented sessions.  The plenary sessions will cover major topics in basic science that relate to clinical practice such as one might find in a Nature or Science major review, e.g. genomics, inflammation, neoplasia.  The short 3-hour selective sessions focus on topics within a discipline, e.g. “Endocrinology for the OBGYN”, “Neonatal Infections”, “Anatomy for OBGYN”, “Anatomy for Pediatrics”, and “Fluids and Electrolytes for the Surgeon”.  Approximately 30-50 of these sessions will be developed and students will be expected to choose 8-10 sessions within their career area, but be free to choose yet other sessions from areas of personal interest. While not intended as review of material from the Foundations or Clerkships some students may chose selectives in areas they wish to know more about or feel the need to “brush-up”.  The selectives should be case-based whenever possible. As most students will have decided on their career field, it is thought that they will be highly motivated to development a deeper understanding of the science underlying their chosen discipline. The career-oriented small groups are to be discipline-specific with multiple groups of ~ 10-15 students each, with a mentor(s) e.g. Medicine, Family Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurology & Psychiatry, Radiology and Anesthesiology. The mentors would likely be clinicians with an interest in basic science application and basic scientists with strong interests in applied basic science. Each medical student will select a topic for in-depth study with mentor guidance and give a presentation using appropriate means, e.g. PowerPoint based on the researched topic. Health Sciences Library and the Office of Medical Education could provide a presentation and/or PowerPoint training session.  It was suggested at the recent Principles meeting that the student should recruit a faculty mentor (basic scientist or clinician) for each presentation; this person would help them prepare for the presentation, probably in a journal club format.

    Resources to implement BS4C include a faculty course coordinator, a course staff coordinator, plenary session directors, selective mentors and career-oriented small group leaders (or co-leaders.  Multiple rooms will be needed for the plenary sessions, the selectives and the career-oriented sessions. 

    Comments from yesterdays May 12th Principles of Medicine Committee included:

    1. concern about the balance of active and passive learning activities in BS4C
    2. limiting the number of plenary sessions, as they are passive
    3. selective sessions should be interactive and case-based when possible
    4. a “Controversies” model used in Microbiology (Bob Kadner) was suggested
    5. concern that BS4C will require an enormous amount of collective effort and questioned the cost effectiveness
    6. offers great potential to tie-in with the basic sciences, returning to basic sciences in a clinical context at a time when medical students would be highly motivated to learn the basic science relevant to their chosen career
    7.David Ryan, 1st year class president, strongly endorsed the concept

Donald Innes

Thanks to Robert Bloodgood for his excellent notes of the May 12 Principles of Medicine meeting.