PMR EMG Rotation

PMR EMG Rotation

PM&R Residency Program Manual
PM&R Resident Rotation Descriptions

PM&R Electrodiagnostic Medicine Rotation  – Dr. Jeff Jenkins
Over the course of three months the PM&R resident will be exposed to nerve conduction studies and electromyography, learning to perform electrodiagnostic studies independently and interpret the results. The first month of the rotation covers operation of the EMG computer, report writing, storing, and retrieval of data. Also covered are the basics of performing both upper and lower extremity studies. A working mastery of relevant neuroanatomy must be attained, including knowledge of the peripheral and root innervations of the limb muscles. Once proficiency at the basics is established, the resident will move on to performing studies on patients. The resident is responsible for keeping the EMG equipment in working order, and keeping the lab stocked with necessary supplies.

Goals and Objectives: At the completion of the Electrodiagnostic Medicine rotation, the resident should be able to demonstrate skills in the following areas:

  • Neuromusculoskeletal anatomy
  • Neurophysiology
  • Medical electronics and equipment safety
  • Understanding and operation of an electromyograph
  • Focused examination prior to the electrodiagnostic plan
  • Basic nerve conduction studies
  • The normal electromyogram (EMG)
  • The abnormal EMG
  • Neurourology
  • Report writing
  • Anomalous innervation
  • Nerve compression syndromes
  • Electrodiagnosis in sports injuries and performing arts
  • Myopathies
  • Motor neuron diseases
  • Peripheral neuropathies
  • Neural transmission disorders
  • Botulinum Toxin Injections for Spasticity
  • Electrodiagnosis research

Responsibilities: Under the attending physician’s guidance - the senior resident will:

  • Assist in training the junior resident on technical skills.
  • Supervise the junior resident in the performance of electrodiagnostic studies, the operation of the equipment, report writing and maintenance of equipment and the EMG laboratory.
  • Order needed accessories (electrodes and other needed items).
  • Generate written electrodiagnostic reports (this duty is shared with the junior resident).
  • Present assigned materials (minimonograph, case report, workshop outlines or other) during regularly scheduled teaching sessions.

The junior resident will:

  • Become proficient in the use of the electromyograph.
  • Once comfortable with the procedure, alternate performing the clinical and electrodiagnostic examination of the patient with the senior resident.
  • Generate written electrodiagnostic reports (this duty is shared with the senior resident).
  • Keep the laboratory neat, electrodes clean and ready for the next examination.
  • Inform the senior resident of any needed supplies.
  • Present assigned materials (minimonograph, case report, workshop outlines or other) during regularly scheduled teaching sessions.

Residents will receive a prepared manual during the EMG Rotation.  This manual should be available to you in the laboratory during the rotation at all times.