Retina Fellowship

Retina Fellowship

UVA Department of Ophthalmology Retina Fellowship information

Vitreo-Retina Fellowship

The Department of Ophthalmology sponsors a two year Vitreo-Retinal Fellowship.  The fellow rotates on his/her own separate service with his preceptors and alternates with the other attendings on a monthly basis throughout the year.  The Retina Service is also covered by a second year resident who shares weekend call.

The fellowship program is a well-preceptored, moderately high volume retina practice with a nice mix of primary and referral vitreo-retinal conditions.

Contacts

Mary Smith

Retina Fellowship Program Administrator
University of Virginia Health System
Department of Ophthalmology
P.O. Box 800715
Charlottesville, VA  22908-0715
Email: MES5BK@virginia.edu
Phone: (434) 982-0855          
Fax: (434) 924-5180
Website: www.uvaeye.com

 

Paul A. Yates, MD, PhDYates, Paul
Retina Fellowship Program Director
Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
Retina Services Director
University of Virginia Health System
Department of Ophthalmology
P.O. Box 800715
Charlottesville, VA  22908-0715
Phone: (434) 243-2811          
Fax (434) 924-5180
Website: www.uvaeye.com

 

Application Information

We participate in the Retina Fellowship Match Program (#4276). The deadline for fellowship application is September 1. We will contact applicants to interview by letter, email, or phone call in September-October.

For further information please contact:

Mary Smith
Retina Fellowship Program Administrator
University of Virginia Health System
Department of Ophthalmology
P.O. Box 800715
Charlottesville, VA 22908-0715
Phone: (434) 982-0855 Fax: (434) 924-5180

 

Ophthalmology Fellowship Match
P.O. Box 7584
San Francisco, CA 94120-7584
Phone: (415) 447-0350 Fax: (415) 561-8535

Additional Information

Dear Applicant:

We appreciate your interest in the Vitreo-Retinal Fellowship at the University of Virginia Health System.  The fellowship encompasses the tutelage of me, Dr. Conway, Dr. Shildkrot and Dr. Reddy, the clinical faculty members of the Vitreo-Retinal Service.  This is a two year fellowship.

Teaching material for the fellowship comes primarily from our outpatient clinics.  We feel the experience is well-balanced between the medical and surgical aspects of vitreo-retinal disease.  Our service does approximately 300 cases a year for surgical vitreo-retinal problems, equally balanced between vitrectomy and scleral buckling procedures.  Approximately 1,000 fluorescein angiograms are performed each year in our photography unit for the evaluation of medical retinal problems.  We see approximately 50 patients each year with ocular tumors, primarily malignant melanoma.  A clinical electrophysiology laboratory is also available for the evaluation of patients with retinal dystrophy.  Patients with retinoblastoma and with retinopathy of prematurity are managed in collaboration with our pediatric ophthalmologists, Dr. Bruce Carter and Dr. Christian Carter.

As the year progresses, the fellow assumes a gradually increasing level of surgical responsibilities.  It is our intention that by graduation the fellow will be comfortable with any type of vitreo-retinal surgery.

The vitreo-retinal fellow directs the Ophthalmic Imaging Conference during which all of the interesting cases seen in the Department over the previous week are reviewed.  This helps to ensure that the fellow reviews all interesting medical retinal problems.

In addition to reviews of our clinical material and reports of interesting cases, the academic and research interests of the service center on the use of animal models and tissue culture techniques to study the problems of proliferative vitreo-retinopathy and diabetic retinopathy, and on the use of computerized vitreous fluoro-photometry to assess the blood-retinal barrier and to follow the course of various ocular disease states.  The vitreo-retinal fellow is encouraged to participate in these studies or in any studies of his own initiation.

We accept applications through the Central Application Service (CAS) which is run by the San Francisco Matching Program

Sincerely,

Paul A. Yates, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
Retina Services Director

Benefits

For information concerning salaries, benefits, parking, meals, etc., please check the UVA Human Resources faculty page here

Environment

Any training program is colored, in part, by the milieu of the surrounding academic center.  The Health System at the University of Virginia lies adjacent to the central grounds of Thomas Jefferson’s original academical village.  Charlottesville and Albemarle County attracts cultural and cosmopolitan functions out of proportion to its 125,000 population supplemented by the 23,000 students of the University of Virginia. From http://charlottesville.org:

Charlottesville offers an impressive variety of cultural, social, and recreational opportunities. There are 26 neighborhood and jointly funded parks and an extensive series of walking trails that run through parkland, residential areas, and along the beautiful Rivanna River.

There is also a thriving art, music and theater community that keeps the creative spirit alive in Charlottesville. A recently opened 4,000 seat Charlottesville Pavilion amphitheater draws big named acts into the downtown area and hosts a weekly Friday After Five concert in the spring through the fall, a local favorite to kick off the weekend. The downtown pedestrian mall is one of the most successful of its kind in the country and boasts over 150 shops and award-winning restaurants. A magnet for art, music, dining, shopping and entertainment, the mall is now home to a newly renovated Paramount Theater, one of few community-supported restorations of historic theaters in the country. The 1,200 seat theater has hosted nationally-known entertainers.  The 16,000 seat John Paul Jones Arena (JPJ) opened in 2006 and has already hosted national caliber events such as The Dave Matthews Band, Rod Stewart, Billy Joel and Cirque du Soleil.  JPJ was recently voted as the Best New Entertainment Venue in the Country.

Other popular activities in the area include world-class tennis, golf, hiking, ballooning, horseback riding and racing, tubing, fishing, biking, camping, and the occasional hunting for antiques. The area also boasts a thriving wine touring and tasting business. The nearly 30 local vineyards make up the state’s largest collection with several wineries winning national recognition.

The nation’s capital is only 120 miles away and there are excellent regular air connections to Washington, D.C., Charlotte, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, and Detroit.  The Skyline Drive and Blue Ridge Parkway, 20 miles from Charlottesville, along with the nearby Appalachian Trail provide some of the best hiking in the United States.  Snow skiing is within an hour’s drive, with night skiing available.  Across the Blue Ridge Mountains, the vistas of the Shenandoah Valley and the rivers and mountains of West Virginia provide some of the best whitewater canoeing and rafting in the world.  Medical students, Housestaff, and Faculty have a share in the stimulating and picturesque ambiance of University life within Piedmont Virginia.

Teaching Conferences

The fellow gives a weekly conference on Intravenous Fluorescein Angiography and Ocular Imaging using interesting teaching cases.  The conference is held each Wednesday, from 7:00 AM – 8:00 AM, immediately prior to Grand Rounds. 

The fellow also presents Grand Rounds presentations three times per year.

Fellows are strongly encouraged to participate in research and presentations at national meetings.