Publications

Publications

Most Recent Publication for Siragy Lab:

Published February 2012:

Sodium depletion enhances renal expression of (pro)renin receptor via cyclic GMP-protein kinase G signaling pathway.

Huang J, Siragy HM.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908-1409, USA.

Abstract

(Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is expressed in renal vasculature, glomeruli, and tubules. The physiological regulation of this receptor is not well established. We hypothesized that sodium depletion increases PRR expression through cGMP- protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway. Renal PRR expressions were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats on normal sodium or low-sodium diet (LS) and in cultured rat proximal tubular cells and mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct cells exposed to LS concentration. LS augmented PRR expression in renal glomeruli, proximal tubules, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. LS also increased cGMP production and PKG activity. In cells exposed to normal sodium, cGMP analog increased PKG activity and upregulated PRR expression. In cells exposed to LS, blockade of guanylyl cyclase with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one decreased PKG activity and downregulated PRR expression. PKG inhibition decreased phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A activity; suppressed LS-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and nuclear factor-κB p65; and attenuated LS-mediated PRR upregulation. LS also enhanced DNA binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1 to cAMP response elements, nuclear factor-κB p65 to nuclear factor-κB elements, and c-Jun to activator protein 1 elements in PRR promoter in proximal tubular cells. We conclude that sodium depletion upregulates renal PRR expression via the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway by enhancing binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1, nuclear factor-κB p65, and c-Jun to PRR promotor.

 

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