Jim Cronk

Jim Cronk

 

JimC

 

I received my undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2008, and entered UVa's Medical Scientist Training Program in 2009. Since beginning my graduate work in the Kipnis lab in 2011, I have been primarily focused on the role of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on immune function. Mutations or duplication of MeCP2 result in Rett syndrome or MeCP2 duplication syndrome, respectively, and both are devastating neurodevelopmental disorders. Our initial work in the Kipnis lab explored the therapeutic benefits of bone marrow transplant in Mecp2-null mice. Since then, we have shown that Mecp2 is an important regulator of macrophage genetic responses, including inflammation, hypoxia, and glucocorticoid signaling. We are currently exploring tissue-specific macrophage functions in the context of Mecp2 deficiency. In regards to MeCP2 duplication syndrome, I am studying a mouse model of influenza infection. MeCP2 duplication patients experience chronic, too often fatal, respiratory infections; we hope to better understand why this occurs and develop therapeutic strategies.

Email:  jcc2cm@virginia.edu