Erik Williams American Society of Hematology Award

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Erik Williams American Society of Hematology Award

Erik Williams, a fourth year medical student at UVA has been chosen to receive the American Society of Hematology HONORS Award.

Erik Williams American Society of Hematology Award

Erik Williams, a fourth year medical student at UVA, one morning in the Library Link Hallway.

Erik Williams has been chosen to receive the American Society of Hematology HONORS Award.  Eirk is a fourth year medical student, applying for residency in Pathology in the fall.  He recieved his undergrad degree from Carleton College, near the historic river town of Northfield, Minnesotafor.

From the American Society of Hematology:  "The HONORS Award (formerly known as the ASH Trainee Research Award) aims to encourage North American medical students and residents who have a demonstrated interest in conducting hematology research but who have not yet entered a hematology-related training program to pursue a research career in the field. The ultimate goal of the award is to contribute to the development of the next generation of hematologists by supporting participants’ hematology research and introducing them to valuable contacts within the hematology research community.

"Each HONORS recipient is awarded a $5,000 stipend to conduct research with a mentor at his or her home institution on either a short-term (maximum of three months) or long-term (three to 12 months) project. Recipients choose their research mentors and work with them to compile and file a report on the research findings. In addition to the $5,000 stipend, all HONORS awardees will receive $1,000 per year for two years to support their attendance at the ASH annual meeting in order to help them establish a support system through interactions with other hematology researchers."

Read more about the award and recipients here.

Erik is working on identifying the roles of key intracellular signaling molecules in the erythroid iron restriction response.  He says, "these pathways are important because they are thought to be closely linked to those in anemia of chronic disease."

Erik applied for this award funding by writing a research proposal with the guidance of a faculty mentor, and describing his previous research experience (3 publications, 2 previous grants) and his interest in hematopathology.

Congratulations Erik!