Excellence in Medical Education: Faculty Development Certificate Program

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Excellence in Medical Education: Faculty Development Certificate Program

This series is presented in collaboration with the Academy of Distinguished Educators. Faculty who attend 10 workshops over a two-year period will receive a Certificate of Commitment to Faculty Development in Medical Education. The certificate can be included as part of the Teaching Portfolio, which in turn can be used for purposes of application for membership to the Academy of Distinguished Educators and/or as part of the portfolio for promotion and tenure.

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This year's recipients of Certificates of Commitment to Faculty Development in Medical Education (left to right):

Huai Yong Cheng, MD
Maurice Apprey, PhD
Randy Canterbury, MD
Roger Burket, MD
Marcia Buck, PharmD
Chris Peterson, MD
Pamela Mason, MD

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Darci Lieb, MEd

Jamieson Bourque, MD

Jim Martindale, PhD, MEd

Ashey Ayers

Tim Bender, PhD

Casey White, PhD

To register for these sessions (session details are listed below), visit the Faculty Leadership Programs course list.

2013-2014 Program Year

TOPIC: Getting beyond "I know one when I see one": Setting defensible learner performance standards for high stakes decisions

Monday, July 8, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Room G165, Claude Moore Medical Education Building

Presenter: Larry D. Gruppen, PhD, Professor, Department of Medical Education, University of Michigan Medical School

Description: We assess learner performance to make decisions, such as competence, promotion, remediation, certification, commendation, etc. To make these decisions, we must set standards or cutpoints for assessment data, but setting standards is both complex and political. This session will address both the techniques and the politics of setting defensible standards for decision making.  Following this session, participants will be able to:  decide when it is worthwhile and necessary to set defensible standards for learner assessments; select among alternative standard setting methods; be able to organize and conduct a reproducible standard setting meeting; and accommodate the political aspects of standard setting.  (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

2. Articles:  Berk. Kaufman. Boulet. Norcini. Hauer. Downing.

TOPIC: Linking Learning Objectives with Methods, Resources, and Assessments

Monday, September 16, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Casey White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Description: Even in cases where faculty members are able to write excellent learning objectives, either because of learning beliefs/preferences and/or limitations in time and resources, learning methods might not facilitate achievement of objectives and assessments might not provide evidence that objectives have been achieved.  In this workshop, participants will discuss how best to design methods and assessments from learning objectives, barriers to doing so and some ways we might overcome the barriers.  Following this session, participants will be able to describe why it is important to begin the course/curriculum design process with learning objectives; discuss barriers to assessing achievement of higher order learning objectives; make decisions about the most appropriate methods and assessment approaches based on a set of specific learning objectives; and evaluate how well linked learning objectives are with methods, resources and assessments. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Advanced: Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Christine Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Description: Before attending this session, participants should either have completed the NBME online tutorial [http://download.usmle.org/IWTutorial/intro.htm] or have attended the Basic Workshop for Writing MCQs. In this session, techniques and strategies for writing MCQs that test higher-order cognition will be reviewed. Participants will practice improving their own questions with partners in the workshop. After participating in this workshop, the learner will be able to distinguish test items that assess higher-order cognition from those that assess lower-order cognition and transform their lower order items to higher-order items.  (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: NxGen Years 1 & 2: Views from our Learners

Wednesday, November 20, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Mary Kate Worden, PhD Associate Professor of Medical Education; and Melanie A. McCollum, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology

Description: At this session, we assemble a panel of pre-clerkship undergraduate medical students and ask them for feedback on the active-learning  sessions they have experienced thus far.  What has worked well for them? What has not?  How can we better design valuable learning experiences for our students?  This is a chance to hear student perspectives on some of the more innovative teaching activities developed by our faculty.  (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: Conducting Research in Medical Education

Tuesday, December 17, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Meeting Room 1 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and James R. Martindale PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education

Description: Many medical school faculty have been trained to conduct basic science, clinical, or translational research but have no experience conducting social sciences research in education.  This workshop will focus on framing an educational research question, conducting qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and drawing appropriate conclusions from the data gathered.  Following this session, participants will be able to frame a research question and design a study that answers the question. (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: Qualitative Research: What Is It and How Do We Conduct It?

Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and Elizabeth B. Bradley, PhD, MEd, Assistant Professor of Medicine

Description: At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to describe qualitative research in medical education; identify representative research questions best explored with qualitative methodologies; identify data collection approaches best suited to answering qualitative research questions; and compare four quality criteria in qualitative versus quantitative traditions. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

2. Handouts: WorksheetQuality Criteria handout, and Content Analysis Exercise


TOPIC: Working within Medical Education's Hidden Curriculum (Grand Rounds Series)

Wednesday, February 11, 2014, 12:00 noon-1:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Frederic W. Hafferty, PhD, Professor of Medical Education, Associate Dean for Professionalism, College of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Program for Professionalism & Ethics at the Mayo Clinic

Description: There has been a lot written about the Digital Native, Digital Immigrant and Digital Wisdom or Literacy as it pertains to the learners of today. Most of this literature originated in the early 2000’s concerning how K-12 pedagogy would react to this new Digital Native. Much has been learned about them over the last decade, but these new learners are rapidly approaching medical school and residency training. This presentation will focus on understanding the today’s learner or generation so that educators can start to appreciate the impact this may have on their teaching style, pedagogy and curriculums of the future.  By the end of this session, participants will be able to discuss current literature on those born in the digital age, explore the generational and demographic differences between learners and teachers of today and describe how the young digital age learners are processing information in the rapidly changing digital time. (1 CME credit

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session


TOPIC: Using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory to Inform Your Teaching

Wednesday, February 19, 2014, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Lisa Rollins, PhD, MEd, Associate Professor of Family Medicine

Description: The basis of Experiential Learning Theory is that we learn through our experiences; specifically, our knowledge is created through the transformation of experience. This is the foundation of the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. This inventory considers learning preferences along two axes:  1) doing/ reflecting, and 2) experiencing/thinking. While we can identify our preferred style within a specific quadrant created by these axes, this theory postulates that learners derive deeper meaning by moving through all 4 quadrants. The purpose of this session is to introduce participants to Kolb theory by: identifying and understanding our personal learning preferences; identifying the qualities associated with the 4 quadrants; considering how these qualities affect our interactions; and applying Kolb to the design of teaching encounters. The session will be highly interactive and will relate to both classroom and clinical teaching. At the session’s conclusion, participants will be able to identify and describe their personal preferred learning styles based on the Kolb Learning Style Inventory; describe the qualities associated with each of the learning quadrants: diverging, assimilating, converging and accommodating; explain how these qualities affect interactions; describe how to apply Kolb to teaching encounters to create deep learning; identify a repertoire of activities that they can implement as they teach in order to move learners through each of the 4 quadrants; and outline a sample teaching session utilizing Kolb experiential learning theory. (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: Development of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and Anne E. Chapin, MEd, Assistant Professor of Medical Education

Description: TBD (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: How to Develop Effective Inter-professional Education Activities

Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Valentina Brashers, MD, FACP, FNAP, Professor of Nursing and John A. Owen, EdD, MSc, Faculty CME Coordinator, Schools of Medicine and Nursing

Description: TBD (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: Professionalism:  How Do We Teach It? How Do We Measure It?


Wednesday, June 18, 2014, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Medical Research Building 5, room 3005

Presenter: P. Preston Reynolds, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine

Description: TBD (1.5 CME credits)

 

2012-2013 Program Year

TOPIC: Team-based Learning

Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Mary Kate Worden, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Christopher M. Burns, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology

Description: Team-based learning (TBL) is an active learning method involving preparation outside the classroom for higher-order activities and collaborative learning in the classroom.  Following this session, participants will be able to explain the key components of a successful TBL module, outline how they would construct a TBL module from a set of objectives, describe how they might convert a course/lecture they already teach into a TBL module, and illustrate how to transform a small group into a productive learning team.  (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. Team Based Learning (TBL) document distributed prior to the session

2. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Writing Multiple Choice Questions That Assess Learning Objectives at Higher Cognitive Levels

Thursday, June 14, 2012, 4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m., G1/G2 Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Christine Peterson, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Description: This interactive workshop is designed for individuals who have experience writing basic (lower-order) multiple choice items that assess recall or comprehension for tests and who want to learn how to transform their items so they are assessing higher-order cognition (assessing application or analysis). Participants will discuss items that do and do not achieve this goal (and why) and will practice transforming their own items with feedback from colleagues.   Following this workshop, participants will be able to distinguish test items that assess higher-order cognition from those that assess lower-order cognition and transform their lower order items to higher-order items.

Materials: 1. IAR, Assess Students, Writing Multiple-Choice Questions

(distributed prior to the session)

2. Designing and Managing MCQs: Apendix C: MCQs and Bloom's Taxonomy

(distributed prior to the session)

3. PPT used during the session - Top Ten Techniques List

4. Helpful Hints handout

TOPIC: Giving Effective Feedback: Key to Learning

Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Linda A. Waggoner-Fountain, MD, MEd, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, and Program Director, Pediatrics Residency Program

Description: Giving effective feedback to learners can greatly enhance achievement of learning objectives and can also help them understand how to manage their learning themselves—a skill they will need for lifelong education. Providing feedback, however, is not always intuitive—there are certain elements that can make the difference between feedback that is helpful and feedback that is not.  In this workshop, we will review basic principles of effective feedback.  Following this session, participants will be able to describe what feedback is and what it is not, describe how and when to give feedback, develop skills in giving feedback, and recognize the importance of providing feedback. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session - Giving Feedback

2. Feedback cases

3. Giving Effective Feedback video clip - Unhelpful and Helpful Feedback

TOPIC: Writing Multiple Choice Questions That Assess Learning Objectives at Higher Cognitive Levels (second offering)

Monday, July 23, 2012, 4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m., Medical Simulation Center Conference Room (G-165)

Presenter: Christine Peterson, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Description: This interactive workshop is designed for individuals who have experience writing basic (lower-order) multiple choice items that assess recall or comprehension for tests and who want to learn how to transform their items so they are assessing higher-order cognition (assessing application or analysis). Participants will discuss items that do and do not achieve this goal (and why) and will practice transforming their own items with feedback from colleagues.   Following this workshop, participants will be able to distinguish test items that assess higher-order cognition from those that assess lower-order cognition and transform their lower order items to higher-order items.

Materials: 1. IAR, Assess Students, Writing Multiple-Choice Questions

(distributed prior to the session)

2. Designing and Managing MCQs: Apendix C: MCQs and Bloom's Taxonomy

(distributed prior to the session)

3. PPT used during the session - Top Ten Techniques List

4. Helpful Hints handout

TOPIC: Getting Started: Developing and Implementing Effective Interprofessional Education

Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Learning Studio, Medical Education Building

Presenter: Scott Reeves, PhD, MSc, PGCE, Director, Center for Innovation in Interprofessional Education, Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Interprofessional Care, University of California, San Francisco

Description: This talk will focus on how faculty and clinical preceptors can provide opportunities for interprofessional education toward effective team-based, patient-centered care. Following this session, participants will be able to define IPE and describe its principles, describe the strategies for developing an effective IPE activity, and offer a range of ideas and approaches for the successful delivery of an IPE activity. Refreshments will be available, compliments of the Medical Alumni Association.

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

2. Group Activity

TOPIC: Searching the Medical Education Literature

Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Carter Classroom, Health Sciences Library (limited to 16 participants)

Presenter: Karen V. Knight, MSLS, Medical Education Librarian

Description: This hands-on workshop will review several databases (MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycInfo) to conduct their own research into the medical education literature, either for classroom application or research).  Following this session, participants will be able to search appropriate databases and list resources within the Health Sciences Library if they have questions. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. Searching For Medical Educators handout

TOPIC: Simulation in Medical Education

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., 2ABC, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Keith E. Littlewood, MD, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Assistant Dean for Clinical Skills Education

Description: This interactive session will include a short history of simulation and discussion of current simulation-based educational approaches.  Participants will assist in the identification and development of new uses of   simulation-based education in UVA’s health sciences educational programs. Following this session, participants will be able to describe the different modalities of simulation currently available and their associated educational value; examine the application of simulation in their teaching activities; and describe representative simulation-based applications in UME, GME and CME at the national level. (1.5 CME credits)

TOPIC: Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Wednesday, November 14, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Christine M. Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Description: While there is some controversy over the effectiveness of multiple-choice questions in assessing higher order cognitive skills, there are also guidelines to ensure that the test questions you write are aligned with the level of learning you expect and truly reflect the knowledge/skills you want students to demonstrate.  The biggest problem with MCQs is that good ones are hard to write—and they are even harder to write for those who are experts in their disciplines.  Following this workshop, participants will be able to evaluate when MCQs are an appropriate approach to assessment, describe the elements of good MCQs, and list common pitfalls to avoid when writing MCQs. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Setting Expectations for Learners: Writing Good Learning Objectives

Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction

Description: This session will help faculty write good objectives for their course/module.  Following this workshop, participants will be able to identify high-quality objectives i.e., those that provide specific information to students about intentions and expectations that include the four elements of effective objectives (audience, behavior, condition, degree); write effective learning objectives in the domains of knowledge, skills, and attitude; and evaluate and critique learning objectives written by others. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. Basic Science Intended Learning Outcomes Handout

2. Bloom's OSCE Article

3. Bloom's Taxonomies Handout

4. Bloom's Wheel Handout

5. PPT used during the session: "Learning Objectives"

TOPIC: Conducting Research in Medical Education

Monday, February 11, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenters: Casey B. White, PhD, Associate Dean for Medical Education, Research, and Instruction and James R. Martindale, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Education.

Description: Many medical school faculty have been trained to conduct basic science, clinical, or translational research but have no experience conducting social sciences research in education.  This workshop will focus on framing an educational research question, conducting qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and drawing appropriate conclusions from the data gathered.  Following this session, participants will be able to frame a research question and design a study that answers the question. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. Handouts used during class

2. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Learning Portfolios and Reflection in Medical Education

Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Daniel M. Becker, MD, MPH, MFA, Tussi and John Kluge Professor and Director, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities

Description: In addition to providing a repository from which students/residents can access important and relevant information over time, learning portfolios can be very effective learning tools.  One of the most common outcomes that educators intend for portfolios is reflection.  Reflection is a difficult habit to teach without a specific context – a portfolio of the learning artifacts acquired by students as they progress through medical school provides an excellent context for them to reflect on their development and growing maturity.  Following this session, participants will be able to describe and apply specific skills and contexts that help to facilitate reflection. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

2. Handout: list of references

TOPIC: Clinical Teaching “on the Fly”: A Microskills Framework

Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Andrew M. Wolf, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine

Description: Teaching in the clinical setting often occurs “on the fly,” and so opportunities for effective teaching and learning can be lost.  However, there are methods clinical teachers can use – especially when pressed for time – to engage students and residents in their learning and also to provide critically important feedback.  Following this workshop, participants will be able to recognize opportunities for “teaching on the fly,” employ specific strategies to enhance clinical teaching when time is significantly limited, and utilize these strategies to provide effective feedback to learners. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. Handout used during class: roleplay scenarios

2. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Effective Mentoring Relationships

Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Sean W. Reed, MD, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Director, Generalist Scholars Program

Description: What distinguishes an outstanding mentor from others?  This workshop will focus on specific characteristics of particularly effective mentoring and the outcomes/benefits such interactions can achieve.  Effective mentoring is not easy but it is vital and can be extremely rewarding to both individuals.  In this interactive session, participants will be asked to share their experiences.  Following this session, participants will be able to list characteristics of effective mentoring, distinguish between effective and ineffective mentoring approaches and relationships, and develop effective solutions for problems that might arise between mentors and mentees.(1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

TOPIC: Maximizing Small Group Teaching and Asking Effective Questions

Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m., G1/G2, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: John B. Schorling, MD, MPH, Harry T. Peters, Sr. Professor of Medicine and Public Health Sciences

Description: Small groups lend themselves to increased engagement among the learners, the instructor, and the content, and are characterized by active participation and contributions by each member of the group.  This workshop will address the skills necessary to effectively lead small groups and facilitate small group learning.  These skills include asking effective questions that foster discussion and discovery. Following this session, participants will be able to describe the dynamics of small groups, assess the individual needs of group members, and design activities and develop questions that will engage learners to achieve the learning objectives. (1.5 CME credits)

Materials: 1. PPT used during the session

2. References

TOPIC: Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions: Basic Workshop

Thursday, May 23, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., Jordan Hall Conference Center OR Wednesday, June 19, 2013, 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m., 2ABC, Jordan Hall Conference Center

Presenter: Christine M. Peterson, MD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Description:

STEP 1: Prerequisite: Complete the online NBME Item-Writing tutorial:  http://download.usmle.org/IWTutorial/intro.htm - the tutorial will take approximately 45 minutes and you can stop and resume at will.

STEP 2: Follow-up this tutorial by practicing writing a few questions about what you teach.

STEP 3: Write 3-5 MCQs to bring with you to the workshop.  The workshop will be offered on three separate dates (please see dates/times, above): please only attend one of these sessions, as they are the same workshop. Bring your newly expanded knowledge to the workshop, and help others by reviewing their questions.